It happens: Your niece draws a crayon masterpiece on your living room wall, or you scratch the molding while moving furniture . . . and now you’re searching the basement for touch-up paint. Before you pick up that paintbrush, check out our top ten touch-up tips to follow—and the five biggest mistakes to steer clear of!—if you want to avoid repainting the entire room.

DO:

  1. Decide if painting is really necessary. First, try removing marks by wiping the wall with a damp, sudsy sponge. You can also gently rubbing the spot with a paste made of baking soda and water—but be careful, because this mixture is mildly abrasive. No luck? Follow these tips for a flawless touch-up.
  2. Prep the surface: Wipe it with a damp, soapy sponge, then rinse it with a fresh damp sponge and dry it with a clean towel.
  3. Open the windows to get some ventilation going before you start painting.
  4. Prime the part of the wall you intend to paint. Use high-quality latex primer, and don’t go beyond the area you’d like to touch up.
  5. Match your touch-up paint to the wall color. It’s always a good idea to store excess paint from the original can specifically for repairs, but if you don’t have any left, visit a store with color-matching technology and ask them to mix an identical color in the same finish.
  6. Maintain the surface texture by using the same applicator as the first time you painted the wall. If the wall was painted with a brush, use a similar brush; if the wall was painted with a roller, use a small, handheld roller.
  7. Dilute the paint slightly (about 10 to 15%) with a thinner recommended by the paint manufacturer. A thin layer of fresh paint will be much less noticeable than a thick patch of paint.
  8. Stir the paint thoroughly, especially if it’s been sitting in your basement for a while.
  9. “Feather” out the paint to create a smooth transition between the patch-up spot and the rest of the wall. If using a brush, extend your strokes slightly beyond the touch-up area. If using a roller, sweep out from the center of the area with a clean, dry roller, slowly lifting away from the wall as you go.
  10. Be patient and wait until the paint has dried completely before evaluating. A touch-up that’s very noticeable when wet may dry into an exact match.

DON’T:

  1. Forget to match the finish. To achieve a seamless look, knowing your satin from your semi-gloss is as important as picking the right color.
  2. Overload your brush with paint. Start with a small amount and reapply as needed so you don’t wind up with a thick, unruly touch-up blob.
  3. Store leftover paint in a hot or sunny spot. Keep extra paint in a cool, dry place, like a basement. Make the paint can as airtight as possible by cleaning the rim before closing the lid.
  4. Shake the paint can before opening it. If this is a can that’s been hanging out in your basement for a couple of years, it likely has a thick film on top. Open the lid and remove this layer before stirring the paint.
  5. Pour paint down your sink or throw it in the garbage—it can clog your sink and is bad for the environment. Take liquid paint to your local recycling center. Dry paint can generally be tossed in the trash. To dry it out, mix it with kitty litter and let it harden.

 

The idea of black mold is alarming enough, let alone seeing something you suspect is black mold in your home. As is so often the case, however, knowledge is power — including the power to calm fear and deal with a current or potential problem head-on. Here’s what you need to know about black mold, the health problems it can cause, and what to do if you think you have it in your home.

Black Mold: What is It?

Stachybotrys chartarum, commonly known as “black mold,” is a mold that’s often black in color (but it can be green-ish or gray as well) and can grow in homes in humid or damp areas. The mold feeds on “organic materials in common household materials like drywall, carpet, insulation or sub-flooring that have been exposed to moisture,” as HGTV describes.

As the mold proliferates, it can release toxic substances. It is these that cause health problems. The CDC explains it this way: “The term ‘toxic mold’ is not accurate. While certain molds are toxigenic, meaning they can produce toxins (specifically mycotoxins), the molds themselves are not toxic, or poisonous.”

However, though the release of mycotoxins does not always occur, the possibility that it can is reason enough to take care of any mold problem (black or not) right away.

Identifying Black Mold

Black mold growing in a visible area is easily seen. However, sometimes you may not be able to see a mold problem that’s occurring behind your walls or in your insulation, for instance. In these cases, you would smell a mold problem and then need to investigate where exactly it is as well as the moisture source that’s causing it. He says, “Just follow your nose. A musty, earthy smell, like dirt and rotting leaves, is a telltale sign of mold’s presence. Stachybotrys smells especially strong.”

Testing for Black Mold

You can have your mold tested to find out exactly what kind it is. Cost varies, but you can expect to pay hundreds of dollars to determine the type of mold.

There are also black mold testing kits, available at the hardware store or Amazon, that you can purchase for around $35-50. With this DIY route, you take samples from a suspected affected surface, then send off to be tested in a lab.

Black Mold Exposure Symptoms

Symptoms of exposure to black mold are similar to symptoms that can occur with exposure to many types of mold. Most commonly, these symptoms include coughing, sneezing, itchy eyes, and irritated throat and nasal passages. Exposure to black mold has also been reported to cause chronic fatigue, headaches, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. Those with allergies to mold are of course more likely to be affected by mold exposure.

As is usually the case, children, the elderly, and those with weakened immune systems are at greater risk of experiencing adverse reactions to mold. Black mold exposure may cause asthma in children who live in an infested environment, and can cause pneumonia in older, susceptible individuals. Fungal infections can also occur upon exposure to mold.

Cleaning Black Mold

Black mold, as well as any other mold that you find growing in your home, should be cleaned immediately. Mold on hard surfaces can be cleaned with “commercial products, soap and water, or a bleach solution of no more than 1 cup of bleach in 1 gallon of water,” per the CDC’s recommendation.

Any time mold is being cleaned, non-porous gloves and eye wear should be worn, along with a mask. Open doors and windows for air circulation. These EPA guidelines though intended for commercial buildings and schools, can also provide some helpful information about cleaning up mold.

Black Mold Removal

Any porous material that has become moldy should be thrown away. This includes ceiling tiles, drywall, and carpet. In cases of extensive mold damage, professional mold remediation specialists should be called in to do the job. Even dead mold can cause health problems, so the affected are needs to be thoroughly cleaned and dried.

To ensure that the mold doesn’t re-grow, the source of the dampness or moisture must be addressed. This means locating and fixing any leaks or broken pipes that are causing the situation, before replacing other material and furnishings.

The bottom line is that though “toxic black mold” is a buzz phrase we’ve all heard and fear, black mold is not necessarily more dangerous than other molds. Any mold growth in the home can be potentially dangerous and should be addressed swiftly and thoroughly.

 

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